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Articles

Articles in the Online Waldorf Library come from many sources. Quite a number are from the archives of journals and publications published over the past 50+ years. When possible we have noted the specific source although this is not always possible.

Included in the "article" search database are all articles in currently in print journals: Gateways, the Research Bulletin and the Waldorf Journal Project.

The Online Waldorf Library includes:
Education as an Art
, the first widely circulated journal about Waldorf education in the United States. It began in 1940 as the Bulletin of the Rudolf Steiner School Association. The purpose of the journal was to inform Americans about Rudolf Steiner's pedagogy. In 1969 the journal became known as Education as an Art: A Journal for the Waldorf Schools of North America.

To search for articles specifically from Education as an Art, please enter the journal name into the search box "with the exact phrase".

Lectures from the 2002 AWSNA National Teacher's Conference, to search for the 8 lectures presented, please enter AWSNA lecture in the search box and click "exact phrase"

But Wickedness Has to Be in It Too!

Download the article: But Wickedness Has to Be in It Too!

Published in Education as an Art Vol. 25, #4 – Autumn 1966
By Georg Starke
Translated by R. P.

The children were playing gleefully with some puppets they had received for Christmas. What they played was naturally an echo of past experience. Both 7-year-olds had seen a Punch and Judy show, and both knew the story of the Garden of Eden. From these memories their play was formed. The Devil was an important member of the cast, and since there was no puppet for the part, another figure substituted for him. But soon the tussles with the Devil became loud and vehement. The grown-up nearby, wishing to curtail just this element, suggested that they rehearse more peaceful, pleasant scenes. And then there rang out a cheerful and absolutely carefree chorus: "Oh, but there has to be some wickedness in it, too!"

Read more: But Wickedness Has to Be in It Too!

By The Waters of Babylon, a play

Download the play: By The Waters of Babylon

by Roberto Trostli

This play for the Third Grade is made available by the author to any class teacher who wishes to produce it.

By The Waters of Babylon in word format is available upon request from the OWL Administrator

Keyword: 3rd Grade, plays, drama

Changes Observed in Kindergarten Children

Download the lecture: Changes Observed in Kindergarten Children

AWSNA lecture given at the AWSNA Teachers’ Conference, Kimberton Waldorf School,
Sunday, June 23, 2002
by Joan Almon

In listening to these various living pictures on kindergarten children from the audience, I was struck again by the many children I’ve worked with. Last October I quietly celebrated 30th years of working with young children. I started a school before I knew about Waldorf and then transformed that school into the Waldorf School of Baltimore. Over these 30 years I have seen huge changes. I am reminded of a conference I went to with friends in Vienna. It was a public school conference with Jörgen Smit in the 80’s. At a workshop he asked us for descriptions of children and similar descriptions were given as we heard just now. He said, “ Aren’t you seeing anything positive that is new?” I was so preoccupied with the problems that I actually could not tell you what was positive. Today, I am hoping to weave back and forth. Yes, the problems are severe but new developments of an inspiring nature can also be observed.

Read more: Changes Observed in Kindergarten Children

Chaos in Everyday Life, About Cleaning and Caring

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by Linda Thomas
Published in Kindling (UK), 2004

When it comes to housekeeping, the concepts of disorder and chaos often get confused. In our households, order is often related to a certain regularity and clarity. I call a room orderly, when everything is in its place and I can easily orientate myself and find my way around without fuss. However, as soon as I start working in the room, or the children start playing around in it, the order very soon turns into disorder. Order seems to have this special quality of merging into disorder without much effort, yet the opposite never occurs. I have to consciously intervene in order to re-establish the lost order.

Read more: Chaos in Everyday Life, About Cleaning and Caring