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Research Bulletin

The Research Bulletin is published by the Research Institute for Waldorf Education, an initiative working on behalf of the Waldorf movement, with the following aims:

  • To serve as a newsletter announcing ongoing research and related activities
  • To carry brief but substantive discussions of fundamental research issues and questions
  • To describe research projects currently underway
  • To provide for the exchange of information and views within a growing body of readers

Contact the Research Institute for subscription information.

The Online Waldorf Library offers articles from all back issues of the Research Bulletin dating from 1996 to the present in pdf format.

An index of the most recent issues can be found on the first page, an index and articles in older issues can be found by scrolling down.

January 1996, Volume 01 #1: Waldorf Education in an Inner City Public School System: A Report

Download the article: Waldorf Education in an Inner City Public School System

On September 3, 1991, the Milwaukee Urban Waldorf School opened as a choice school within the Milwaukee Public School System. Although the Milwaukee Urban Waldorf School was one among a number of magnet schools, each of them representing different philosophies and approaches to education, its founding was, nevertheless, important and unique. In the first place, it represented a response to a search by the Milwaukee Superintendent of Schools, at the time Robert Peterkin, and his staff, along with the Milwaukee Board of Education, for a healing education that could meet the special needs of children in educationally underserved areas of the city. The opening of the school, furthermore, was the result of an unusual and many sided collaboration among public school leaders, Waldorf educators, public school teachers and academic scholars of education. The Milwaukee School Superintendent’s office and Board of Education, volunteer Waldorf teachers from member schools across the country of the Association of Waldorf Schools of North America (AWSNA), the education faculty, headed by Professor Belden Paulsen, of the University of Wisconsin and a group of Milwaukee public school teachers, themselves attracted to the prospect of participating in a new approach to education--all worked together to make the founding of the school possible.

Read more: January 1996, Volume 01 #1: Waldorf Education in an Inner City Public School System: A Report

January 1996, Volume 01 #1: The Urban Waldorf School of Milwaukee: A Summary Report

Download the article: The Urban Waldorf School of Milwaukee

(Reprinted by Permission of Renewal)

For the past few years, the City of Milwaukee has been opening public schools based on models of education that are intended to help children from diverse backgrounds. In September, 1991, the Urban Waldorf School of Milwaukee welcomed 343 children, most of them from the surrounding inner-city neighborhood. In the United States, Waldorf schools mostly have served middle-class students whose families could afford tuition. In Milwaukee, it was hoped, the Waldorf approach could be adapted as an effective model for educating urban children in public schools.

A team of seven researchers who study learning in schools was brought together by the Waldorf Schools Fund to visit and study the Urban Waldorf School. Our team was to ask: Just what is being done in the school? Does it work? Can it be copied? In our full report, we try to describe what is going on, and we offer opinions about whether it works, and, if so, whether it can be duplicated. In this summary, we offer only our conclusions.

Read more: January 1996, Volume 01 #1: The Urban Waldorf School of Milwaukee: A Summary Report